Posted on 31st July, 2018

Supporting businesses – an analysis of key metrics within complaints

How does working with Resolver affect these key metrics?

The graphs below show the net increase in the scores of three businesses within the telecoms industries, each with a different level of engagement with Resolver. Company A and Company B both represent companies who interact with Resolver at a base level, while the third company shown is leading telecoms provider Three, who are promoting Resolver as their channel of choice for online email and complaint engagement. Three began working closely with Resolver in May of 2017, and have seen a notable improvement in their performance across all key metrics.

 

Measuring customer satisfaction

When Resolver needs to determine how happy a company’s customers are with its services, we refer to CSAT (customer satisfaction score). We publish the highest scoring companies frequently, to recognise when businesses are performing well.

When it comes to customer services and issue resolution, CSAT is affected by a number of variables. It’s key to note that it’s important to manage a customer’s expectations – if they have unreasonable expectations going into a complaint, it’s likely they’ll be disappointed by the outcome. This is where Resolver can help. By keeping customers informed about their rights, Resolver narrows the gap between what customers expect and what businesses can deliver. Resolver captures key information at the first point of contact, making sure that the information a company has to work with is both clear and relevant.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Measuring customer effort

CES, or customer effort score, reflects the amount of work a customer has had to go through to get the response they’re looking for. The better the customer effort score, the more customers feel that your organisation has made it easy for them to handle their issue. This is absolutely crucial – customers hate to feel that their time is being wasted, and a customer who feels like a business is on their side is more likely to return.

A number of factors affect CES, including the speed of response (it’s important businesses respond quickly, but also that they respond consistently – it’s no good to leave a complaint idle for an extended period of time), the language used (a sympathetic tone goes a long way, but it’s equally important that plain English is used – a customer should never feel that a business is trying to outwit or deceive them), and the proposed outcome of the complaint (if your customer feels it will be impossible to get the outcome they’re looking for, they may be inclined to disregard any efforts you’ve made so far). It’s crucial to give customers a clear outline of exactly where their case is. If there’s any confusion about the process involved in getting an issue resolved, this can affect CES.

 

Measuring customer loyalty

NPS allows businesses to determine how loyal their customers are. This is crucial, as loyal customers are more likely to recommend the business to others (as well as to return to the business themselves). NPS is calculated on responses to the question “How likely are you to recommend our business to a friend or colleague?”, with responses scored on a scale of 0-10, with 10 being the best possible score.

A high NPS indicates that a business has a loyal customer base who will buy more, return to the company over and over, and refer the business to others. A low NPS score is a sign of problems, as unhappy customers are likely to deter others from giving a business a chance.

Resolver guides the businesses we work with towards the best possible outcome for both them and their consumers. By allowing businesses to isolate touchpoints per complaint type, Resolver makes it easy to identify exactly where loyal customers are slipping through the net. The aim is to deliver a cost-effective way of improving customer retention, and we do this by giving businesses granular insight into points of contention raised by their customers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

NPS allows businesses to determine how loyal their customers are. This is crucial, as loyal customers are more likely to recommend the business to others (as well as to return to the business themselves). NPS is calculated on responses to the question “How likely are you to recommend our business to a friend or colleague?”, with responses scored on a scale of 0-10, with 10 being the best possible score.

A high NPS indicates that a business has a loyal customer base who will buy more, return to the company over and over, and refer the business to others. A low NPS score is a sign of problems, as unhappy customers are likely to deter others from giving a business a chance.

Resolver guides the businesses we work with towards the best possible outcome for both them and their consumers. By allowing businesses to isolate touchpoints per complaint type, Resolver makes it easy to identify exactly where loyal customers are slipping through the net. The aim is to deliver a cost-effective way of improving customer retention, and we do this by giving businesses granular insight into points of contention raised by their customers.

The data is clear – since Three began promoting Resolver as their channel of choice for complaints, they have seen a dramatic increase across all key complaints metrics. This is great news for both the business and their customers, as it shows that Three are delivering a better service that will keep their customers coming back.

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